Alzheimer's Daughter

The Story

Alzheimer’s Daughter introduces the reader to my healthy parents, Ed and Ibby, years before their diagnosis, then recounts painful details as our roles reversed and I became my parents’ parent.


Their disease started as translucent, confused thoughts and ended in a locked memory care unit after a near decade of descent into the opaque world of Alzheimer's.

I began writing Alzheimer’s Daughter one week after my mother's death––when I was stunned, realizing Dad had no memory of her or their 66-year marriage.

I write to pay tribute to the undying spirit at Ed and Ibby's core, and with the hope that the story of their parallel decline might be helpful to others.

Thursday, December 17, 2015

Snow Couple Pin


For 22 years I taught elementary school, most of those years were spent at 3rd grade. I loved third graders. They were young enough to enjoy school, plus they were thirsty learners. We became like a second family as a year progressed.

Beginning the first day back to school after Thanksgiving weekend, every teacher pulled out all of their red and green clothing as well as every piece of dime-store Christmas jewelry—blinking earrings, jingle bell bracelets, Santa necklaces, and a variety of pins.

This pin was always my favorite. It brought a calm upon me. The posture of the snow people demonstrated caring, love, and protectiveness—a soft-spoken calm in an otherwise noisy season.

Rather than wear the pin on a blouse or sweater, I pinned it on the left lapel of my winter coat, so it was a daily part of me. I’d forget about it as the season progressed, but often someone would compliment and I’d remember the pin I wore over my heart. The sweetness of the snow people reminded me of my mom and dad’s relationship.

I don’t recall how I obtained the pin. Maybe I bought it, but I imagine Mom gave it to me as a thoughtful little gift.

I don’t wear all of the glitzy glittery Christmas jangles now, but I’m thankful for the Christmas memory of Mom and Dad as I attach this pin to my coat this season.



2 comments:

Vicki Tapia said...

Although I never personally met your parents, I agree with you; somehow that little pin does remind me of one of the pictures I've seen of them! Amazing!

Marianne Sciucco said...

Such a tender memory. They remind me of your parents whom I've met only through your writing.